Comments for 2¢ WorthSeeking the to express the ShakabukuMon, 25 Feb 2019 04:01:39 +0000hourly1https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.11Comment on The Viking Warrior by Sharing Diigo Links and Resources (weekly) | Another EducatorAl Blog/?p=5662#comment-535557Mon, 25 Feb 2019 04:01:39 +0000/?p=5662#comment-535557[…] The Viking Warrior – 2¢ Worth […]

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Comment on Eight Practices for Promoting Media Literacyor My Challenges for School Year 2018-2019 by Anitra Thompson/?p=5382#comment-535551Tue, 29 Jan 2019 01:55:00 +0000/?p=5382#comment-535551I appreciated this read. You presented some truly valid points in regards to promoting literacy not only in school but ways it can be used at home as well. Literacy strategies are helpful and be used across the content curriculum. Your eight practices can be beneficial to increasing student vocabulary as well. The practice of asking students to cite their evidence is helpful for accountability talks and understanding topics in context. The idea of also being human and apologizing for when things are done wrong is remarkable. I believe this is helpful in building a relationship and creating an atmosphere where individuals feel that it is a safe space to learn. The practices are helpful as it also embodies the idea of also sharing your own interest with students and technology to assist in the process. It was truly a great read and a way to become more reflective in my instruction.

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Comment on Use Your Department of Education to… by Damaris Mitchell/?p=5022#comment-535548Fri, 25 Jan 2019 01:42:00 +0000/?p=5022#comment-535548Your article speaks volumes. With the current state of our country, teaching history has become one of the most powerful tools we have. I have seen, over the years, where english, math, and science remains at the forefront, but social studies is on the back burner. Maybe people believe social studies is not important because they think basics for life are not included. This belief could not be further from the truth. Social studies plays a more vital role in our lives than it ever has. We must be able to keep up with the rapid changes of the world and this can only be accomplished by students learning their rich history. Some value has been added to history’s importance because now, and in previous years, my state requires students to pass a U. S. History end of year assessment in addition to those in math, english, and science. Yes, it helps to increase the level at which history is taught, but does it increase the value of the knowledge given to students. It’s hard to say due to many students learning only what is necessary to be successful on the task and teachers teaching only what is required. If social studies is to have its’ rightful place, it must be viewed just as important as the major subjects and will only begin with history lovers fighting for their rightful place. History instruction has evolved over the years, but it is definitely not where it deserves to be on the educational hierarchy.

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Comment on A Couple of Observations about the Election by Ed Darrell/?p=5046#comment-535545Sat, 12 Jan 2019 20:09:00 +0000/?p=5046#comment-535545Not only do I wonder about every state as does Mr. Lessig, I want someone to go the next few steps and explain how to correct for this bias.

Is it because Democrats don’t talk enough about farms? If so, how did Trump gain popularity there by similarly avoiding discussion of agriculture issues, about which he now appears to be completely unaware, if not hostile?

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Comment on Staff Sergeant Edward Carter Jr. by Ed Darrell/?p=5440#comment-535544Sat, 12 Jan 2019 20:06:00 +0000/?p=5440#comment-535544A story that might enliven discussions of world history prior to World War II, or race relations in America . . . and probably left out of every curriculum specified by the states, or even created by individual teachers.

Is he even honored as part of Black History Month?

Thanks for the story, and the reminder that a lot of the best history is just left out and forgotten. But shouldn’t be.

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Comment on Eight Practices for Promoting Media Literacyor My Challenges for School Year 2018-2019 by Karin/?p=5382#comment-535533Wed, 21 Nov 2018 17:49:00 +0000/?p=5382#comment-535533As a current student teacher pursuing a Master’s degree in Secondary Education, I really appreciated your post about fostering critical evaluation in the classroom. Your eight practices align closely to what I have been learning in my Social Studies Methods and Literacy courses this semester. We have practiced conducting a “Think-Aloud” alongside students to pull back the curtain around our teacher thinking process when evaluating a historical source. Do you have examples of how teachers used critical evaluation in their classes, especially around current political topics? On your 7th point, do you think talking about your own interests and research could be problematic if students take that as a representation of your teaching? For example, I’m interested in LGBTQ rights, but that is a controversial topic to bring up in the classroom. How can teachers strike a balance of sharing personal interests while keeping the focus on academics? Thank you for providing some insight and I would love to learn more!

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Comment on What is 21st Century Learning? by Kat/?p=1858#comment-535532Tue, 20 Nov 2018 22:14:00 +0000http://davidIstlandoll.com/2cents/?p=1858#comment-535532I feel that with the 21st century teaching and learning approach is extremely different because the new technology has changed the way students learn. If we as teachers don’t keep up and recognize the fact that students today have to have so much more stimuli (such as the video games they play) just in order to keep their attention. I like to create web-quests, web-based research projects as well as using the many educational programs and games found on-line.

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Comment on Who Believes “Fake News” by Victoria Milano/?p=5433#comment-535531Sat, 17 Nov 2018 14:04:00 +0000/?p=5433#comment-535531I am very intrigued by your view about “fake news” imposing upon the rigidity of our standards and curriculum. W. James Pophem comments, “curriculum-teaching, if it is effective, will elevate students’ scores on high-stakes tests and, more important, will elevate students’ mastery of the knowledge or skills on which the test items are based” (2001). I commend your comment that we are educating students to know the one acceptable answer. With this point, teaching to the test limits our students’ view of being openminded, and therefore refusing to accept evidence towards alternative views. It can be difficult to implement student opinions and reflective processes while maintaining the mastery of each standard that will be tested.

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Comment on Eight Practices for Promoting Media Literacyor My Challenges for School Year 2018-2019 by Brian Ramirez/?p=5382#comment-535528Mon, 24 Sep 2018 03:06:00 +0000/?p=5382#comment-535528Some students, now more than ever, are relying on “googling” for the right answers. As a result, they often miss the big picture, the overarching concept of what it is that they are learning. I know technology can be a great tool for education. But it is a double-edged sword that can also hurt in the full understanding of the concept. How do you teach and train students to think this way?

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Comment on It really is a Revolution by Sharon Dixon/?p=5397#comment-535527Sat, 22 Sep 2018 19:26:00 +0000/?p=5397#comment-535527The world of today, and tomorrow, certainly requires these ‘fearless and resourceful learners’ that you speak of. It is rather daunting to be tasked with empowering the learners of tomorrow, when one cannot imagine what lies ahead … ‘fearless and resourceful’ the teachers need to be too.

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